Buying a property in Italy? Read the complete Purchase Process.

Understanding the process of buying property in Italy through an italian real estate agency.

An overview of information about buying property in Italy through an italian real estate agency. Read more.

Country house with fantastic lake and mountain view. Abruzzo.

Country house for sale, with stunning panoramic view of the Majella mountain and the Sant’Angelo lake in Casoli, Italy.

Country house of 150 sqm surrounded by 2.500 sqm of land with storage building. 105.000 €. View Property.

Country house with courtyard, garden and olive grove.

Large property with terraces, paved courtyard, orchard and olive grove for sale in Molise, Italy.

Large property of 158 sqm with 2 terraces. Paved courtyard, orchard and 5.800 sqm of land with olive grove. 125.000 €. View Property.

Restored traditional town house close to the Trabocchi coast.

Character palazzo with vaulted ceilings and exposed bricks for sale in Italy, near the beach.

Traditional townhouse of about 300 sqm with gorgeous exposed bricks and vaulted ceilings. 320.000 €. View Property.

Life in Abruzzo. Events and Traditions.

This blog promotes life style in Abruzzo and Molise regions. Events, festivals, traditions and many others interesting, funny and useful tips about Abruzzo and Molise.

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 The village of Palmoli sits perched on an isolated hill towering over the western side of the river Treste at an altitude of 727 meters. The habitable settlement was built on the southern slopes of the rock, there is a steep uninhabited cliff reaching down to the west side to the river. Palmoli is prominent and proud in its historical defence overlooking many other small villages similarly perched on outcrops in the valley. Surrounded by beautiful views of the Maiella & Gran Sasso mountains and a good stretch of the Adriatic coast at just 29 km. There is easy access to the Trignina valley and main road that runs towards the sea, at less than 30 minute’s drive and the medieval city of Vasto or towards Molise and further through to Rome and Napoli. Located within the Chieti region of southern Abruzzo and part of the Vastese hills Palmoli has a very small population of around 1000 inhabitants.

The historical centre is nestled on a long ridge with two main through roads and numerous medieval vico’s (side streets) running perpendicularly to the main streets. The Marquise castle and tower is to be found in the main square at the highest point of the village, with a pine tree framed park and children’s playground, a shaded & peaceful place to relax whilst taking in the stunning panoramic views of the mountains, sea and nearby villages. The top of the tower provides an amazing panoramic view of surrounding landscape.

Contents

  1. History
  2. Local festivals and traditions
  3. A few highlights of the local cuisine
  4. Places to visit
  5. What to watch out for
  6. Palmoli housing market

History

The village, originally called Palmula Monteverde, has very ancient roots. Around the year AD 1000, citizens, to defend themselves from barbaric raids, took refuge on the mountain, where in 1095 Pandolfo di Sangro built the oldest part of the castle, around which the urban centre then developed. In the 13th century the village then called ‘Palmula’ was governed by Filippo Grandinato, a member of a feudal family from Lombard. In the 15th century it belonged to Paolo di Sangro and at the end of the 18th century to Severino-Longo, Marquises of San Giuliano and Galiati. The ancient ruins are traceable in the medieval castle with the Marquisal chapel of San Carlo and in the characteristics of the village, full of courtyards, porches, stone portals, lunettes and railings in wrought iron and cast iron.

The chapel has a remarkable façade with a stone portal dating from the 18th century. Within the medieval walls remain two gates: Porta da Capo, called the Ribellino and Porta da Piedi, connected by a single lane. The bell tower of the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie dates back to the fourteenth century. It was rebuilt around the middle of the eighteenth century on the site of an older church that held the body of St Valentino. The church displays a carved and gilded eighteenth-century organ in which a snake and a fish are figuratively sculpted. Leaving the village, you will find the Sanctuary Mariano of Maria SS.ma del Carmine, part of the convent built by the Friars of San Francesco in 1583. With a classical design of this type of structure, a church and internal cloisters built to host the friars.

Local festivals and traditions

The local festivals here are steeped in tradition, fully enjoyed and proudly hosted by the whole of the local community. Palmoli’s Patron Saint is St Valentino and so February 14th is of particularly note, the day usually includes a procession with a nearby local band playing.

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Posted by on in Taxes in Italy

My name is Monia Di Guilmi, and I am a realtor based in Abruzzo, Italy. I have been working as an international real estate agent for the past 8 years. I speak English, Italian, and Spanish. Throughout my real estate career, I have sold numerous properties to clients from all over the world.

Lately, while browsing the internet, I’ve found many articles explaining how to buy property in Italy, including how the purchase process works. I’ve been very interested to read these articles, but the more I read, the more I’m confused by what they advocate.

For example, many websites state that to buy a house in Italy, you’ll have to hire a lawyer. Really? If so, what about the notary? Why is the role of the notary never explained? Sometimes, the notary is not even mentioned.

What about the purchase proposal — isn’t that necessary too?
How much of a down payment is required to buy an Italian house?

I’m hard-pressed to find any of this information! So, to clear up the confusion, I will try to answer these and other questions in the following article.

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Tagged in: Purchasing process

If you’d told me when I was a young girl in the Midwest that someday I’d own a house in Italy, I’d probably have laughed it off. Owning a home in a foreign country — any foreign country, let alone Italy — always seemed to me like something that only movie stars did.

But here I am today, a middle class American with a second home in the beautiful, green region of Abruzzo, Italy. It’s a dream come true and something that brings me and my husband great joy.

Buying a home in Italy may seem complicated and confusing. The truth is, the process is very simple and straight-forward — as long as you choose the right real estate agency. Offering residents an attractive lifestyle with an emphasis on family, scenic beauty and world-famous food and wine, expats moving to Italy will be seduced by the country and its passion for la dolce vita.

My husband and I were looking for homes specifically in the Abruzzo region because of the amazing property prices there right now. We went with Abruzzo Rural Property, and it was the best choice we could have made.

Below, I’ll explain some tips and advice for first-time American home buyers in Italy. I’ll also explain how the home buying process in Italy differs from that of the United States.

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Tagged in: Purchasing process

One Year Later, Interest In These Properties Has Increased Nearly 200%

 Considered the greenest part of Europe, with three national and five regional parks, this spot boasts beautiful coastal towns, charming medieval hamlets, and hilltop villages with breathtaking panoramic views—who wouldn’t love this ideal location?

The climate here is typically Mediterranean, with four seasons and very mild winters. Situated on the Adriatic Sea, it’s a coastal region with 134 kms of beaches, but it’s also a mountain region with well-known ski resorts and the highest peak in the Apennines.

This diverse place is Abruzzo, located in Central Italy.

Abruzzo was mostly unknown to international tourists until 2001 when the low-cost airline Ryanair launched a route from London Stansted Airport to Pescara, Italy, the most convenient airport for this region.

In the last few years, people from all over Europe, the States, Australia, Israel, and South Africa have started buying properties in Abruzzo. In February 2018, the leading property web portal Rightmove calculated that among its worldwide users, interest in Abruzzo properties has increased by 192% compared to last year.

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